Is Teacher Burnout An Issue? | Last Week’s Best Articles In Education

Our team is always seeking the latest news in the field of education. As advocates for a quality education for ALL students, we know we have to stay up-to-date on everything that’s going on in the education spheres of our nation…from the White House to the local public school district, from new legislation to the small acts of bravery and kindness made by a single teacher, from the milestones and celebrations to the hazardous injustices affecting many of our nations students.

Here are the best stories we came across last week…because we believe you should stay up-to-date, too!


 

Microsoft’s education team unveils five online courses on digital pedagogy and leadership, aimed at K-12 administrators via Inside Higher Ed

“Microsoft’s education team on Monday unveiled five massive open online courses on digital pedagogy and leadership aimed at administrators in the K-12 sector. The MOOCs, which will be offered through edX, bear Microsoft’s stamp of approval but are created by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the University of Michigan and the University of Queensland. The courses will launch in the first quarter of next year. ”


Post navigation New guidelines for teacher preparation announced at USC by Secretary of Education John King with LAUSD’s Michelle King

New guidelines for teacher preparation announced at USC by Secretary of Education John King with LAUSD’s Michelle King via LA School Report

“The regulations call for more detailed information to be gathered on how new teachers are performing, aim to provide better tracking of retention rates, offers more flexibility to states in how they measure the performance of preparation programs and require states to report annual ratings on their programs.”

 


The 74 Fact-Check: Are Teachers Really Burning Out Because of Tougher Tests and Evaluations?

The 74 Fact-Check: Are Teachers Really Burning Out Because of Tougher Tests and Evaluations?via The 74 Million

“Only one poll to my knowledge shows that teacher morale has taken a ‘nosedive.’ This was a widely cited survey conducted in 2012 that found that only 39 percent of teachers reported being satisfied with their jobs, compared with a high-water mark of 62 percent in 2008. It’s not clear what caused this decline, but the survey finds that declining school funding — a common phenomenon in the aftermath of the Great Recession — was associated with lower morale.

 


 

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